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Indian Conference - Low in Evening Standard, London, 1930.

Mixed Bathing is popular in the Serpentine! But not so a mixed conference at St. James! George Lansbury is a favourite with the votaries of the bath; Captain Benn lacks his colleague’s good fortune! Bathers are grateful for amenities conferred: but not Congressmen for opportunities afforded. A pleasant bath will cool tempers! It will do immense good for the fretting Nationalist! “Yoo-Hoo” cries Lord Irwin hipdeep in water. “Why do you not join us”. “What could be better” he asks, hailing the Gandhis “than a splash with argument or a dive into the cool waters of Reason?.” The Gandhis peep from their Salt-water Tub and look sullenly on. Little Benn does a little splashing. Suave Irwin calls persistently. The Princes and the Moderates are already there. What mighty fun they are having! But – But there is Sir John Kill-Hope! He floats like a Log. But he has muddied the waters already! He looks dead; he is alive. Irwin calls; the invitation stands; - but the Gandhis look on. – preferring Salt-water Tub to the Serpentine! In July 1930, Irwin attempted to persuade Gandhi, who was in Yeravda jail, to agree to attend the first Round Table Conference on constitutional reforms for India the British Government had decided to hold in London. The Liberal leader M. R. Jayakar was entrusted with the task of negotiating a settlement between the Congress and the Government so that the satyagraha may be called off. The negotiations failed and Churchill commented in London: "The Government of India had imprisoned Mr. Gandhi and they had been sitting outside his cell door begging him to help them out of their difficulties."

Credit: Navajivan / GandhiServe
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